Engaging the workforce

Getting past once-and-done measurement surveys to achieve always-on listening and meaningful response

Engaging the workforce
Posted by Alyson Daichendt on September 15, 2016.

More than 8 in 10 (85 percent) of the executives responding to our Global Human Capital Trends 2016 survey rated engagement as an important (38 percent) or very important (48 percent) priority for their companies. But company actions regarding engagement don’t always support that level of importance. Just over half of the respondents (64 percent) say they are measuring employee engagement once a year, and a surprising number—nearly one in five (18 percent)—said their companies don’t formally measure employee engagement at all. As the workforce and its expectations about work evolve rapidly, employers should start treating engagement as the business-critical issue it is.

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Culture vs. Engagement

Avoiding the runaway strategy bus (or getting it under control before it crashes)

Culture vs. Engagement

Posted by Alyson Daichendt on August 23, 2016.

We’re having a #TBT moment, thinking about the classic ’90s movie, Speed. You remember it—there’s a runaway bus that can’t drop below 50 mph or it will explode AND the driver is critically injured—dun dun dun…. Cue Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock jumping in and guiding the bus safely through traffic while diffusing the bomb and saving the day. What brought this to mind (other than a recent TV movie marathon on a rainy Sunday afternoon)? It’s a situation we see play out repeatedly in the workplace.

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It takes two to tango

Or, how much can organizations influence employee engagement?

It takes two to tango

Posted by Robin Erickson, Ph.D. on August 18, 2016.

I’ve been studying employee retention and engagement for almost 15 years. During that time, engagement rates—or more accurately, disengagement rates, have been an ongoing problem. Gallup’s State of the American Workplace reports that from 2000 to 2016, only 26 to 33.6 percent of American workers were engaged in their work—and 15 to 20 percent were actively disengaged.1,2 Aside from what we can intuitively glean from this situation (e.g., lackluster performance, people simply going through the motions), lack of engagement also factors into “trouble” metrics, such as increases in voluntary turnover, absentee rates, mistakes and safety issues, and employee claims (such as grievances, workers’ compensation applications, and Equal Employment Opportunity complaint filings).3

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