Will talent be the weak link in the supply chain of the future?

Strengthen the ties between HR and the supply chain organization

Will talent be the weak link in the supply chain of the future?

Posted by Kelly Marchese
and Ben Dollar on June 11, 2015.

For the third year in a row, Deloitte surveyed supply chain leaders (400 executives from global companies) to understand their most important issues and the steps they’re taking to address them. This year’s report of the survey findings, Supply Chain Talent of the Future, highlights the sweeping transformation underway in the supply chain function and the talent challenges emerging as make-or-break factors in achieving transformation goals. As in previous surveys, we see marked differences between supply chain “leaders” and “followers” in how they’re tackling both transformation and talent. This survey also highlights an interesting disparity—and a corresponding opportunity—concerning the relationship between HR and the supply chain organization. Continue reading “Will talent be the weak link in the supply chain of the future?”

2015 Millennial Survey gives insight to inform leadership and talent agendas

2015 Millennial Survey

Understanding how Millennials perceive businesses and what they expect from them is critical to engaging and attracting this workforce of the future. More than 7,800 Millennials in 29 global emerging and developed markets contributed their views to Deloitte’s fourth annual Millennial Survey. Their responses reveal a mix of positive and negative perceptions about business, with this overarching message: Business needs to reset its purpose to attract Millennials.

The survey results suggest businesses, particularly in developed markets, need to make significant changes to attract and retain the future workforce. On the plus side: 73 percent of Millennials surveyed believe that businesses are having a positive impact. This was especially true in the emerging markets of Indonesia (98 percent), Philippines (91 percent), India (90 percent), China (89 percent), and Mexico (89 percent). However, the highest number of respondents reporting a negative business impact on society came from developed markets: Germany (66 percent), Belgium (59 percent), France (56 percent), Japan (55 percent), and Italy (44 percent).

Also on the plus side, 61 percent of respondents believe many businesses take a strong leadership position on issues that impact wider society—showing even stronger leadership on important social issues than governments. However, an overwhelming 75 percent of those surveyed also question businesses’ motivation, believing many focus on their own agendas rather than helping to improve society. Instead, respondents believe business should focus on people and purpose, not just products and profits.

“The message is clear: When looking at their career goals, today’s Millennials are just as interested in how a business develops its people and how it contributes to society as they are in its products and profits,” said Barry Salzberg, CEO of Deloitte Global. “These findings should be viewed as a wake-up call to the business community, particularly in developed markets, that they need to change the way they engage Millennial talent or risk being left behind.”

Only 28 percent of Millennials feel their current organization is making full use of their skills. More than half (53 percent) aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization, with a clear ambition gap between Millennials in emerging markets and developed markets. Sixty-five percent of emerging-market-based Millennials said they would like to achieve this goal, compared to only 38 percent in developed markets. This figure was also higher among men.

Additionally, the survey found large global businesses have less appeal for Millennials in developed markets (35 percent) compared to emerging markets (51 percent). Developed-market-based Millennials are also less inclined (11 percent) than Millennials in emerging markets (22 percent) to start their own business.

Other notable findings from the survey include:

  • Millennials want to work for organizations with purpose. For six in 10 Millennials, a “sense of purpose,” is part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers.
  • Technology, media, and telecommunications (TMT) are the most attractive employers. TMT ranked most desirable sector and the one to provide the most valuable skills according to Millennials. Men (24 percent) were nearly twice as likely as women (13 percent) to rank TMT as the number one sector to work in. Google and Apple top the list of businesses that most resonated with Millennials as leaders, each selected by 11 percent of respondents.
  • Confidence Gap? Millennial men more likely to pursue leadership. Millennial men were somewhat more likely to say they would like to secure the “top job” within their organization than women (59 percent vs. 47 percent). Women were also less likely to rank their leadership skills at graduation as strong; 27 percent of men vs. 21 percent of women rated this skill as strong. However, when asked what they would emphasize as leaders women were more likely to say employee growth and development (34 percent compared to 30 percent), an area that many Millennials felt was lacking within their current organizations.
  • Organizations and colleges must do more to nurture emerging leaders. When asked to estimate the contributions that skills gained in higher education made to achievement of their organization’s goals, Millennials’ average figure is 37 percent.
  • The changing characteristics of leadership. Today’s Millennials place less value on visible (19 percent), well-networked (17 percent), and technically skilled (17 percent) leaders. Instead, they define true leaders as strategic thinkers (39 percent), inspirational (37 percent), personable (34 percent) and visionary (31 percent).

“Millennials want more from business than might have been the case 50, 20, or even 10 years ago,” said Salzberg. “They are sending a very strong signal to the world’s leaders that when doing business, they should do so with purpose. The pursuit of this different and better way of operating in the 21st century begins by redefining leadership.”

To access the full report and explore infographics about the survey, please visit: www.deloitte.com/millennialsurvey.


As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte Consulting LLP, a subsidiary of Deloitte LLP. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

HR Times Redux: Have you seen these top posts?

labor Cost Optimization

Over the past three years, HR Times has been discussing the talent-workforce-leadership-learning-organizational sphere with a broad audience of HR leaders and practitioners from business, industry, and government. We’ve looked at the trends and technologies, the challenges and risks, and the opportunities and imperatives for the future. Now we’re taking a brief look back. Here are a few of the top posts that have garnered the most attention. Did you miss any? Take a look and take away some food for thought.

Continue reading “HR Times Redux: Have you seen these top posts?”

Video: Curating the Talent Experience and Restructuring Work Environments

Looking at business-driven HR through the supply chain lens

Posted by Cathy Benko on June 30, 2014

Today’s organizations, and CHROs in particular, should think differently about how they attract and develop talent especially during the “Big Shift.” In this video post, Cathy Benko, a vice chairman and managing principal at Deloitte LLP, highlights four dominant themes on CHROs’ agenda: recalibrating their role and skills, and those of their teams, to align with organizational goals; embracing the open talent economy to connect with talent wherever it resides; leveraging predictive analytics to better understand talent needs and trends; and “curating” the talent experience to attract, retain, and cultivate top talent.

Continue reading “Video: Curating the Talent Experience and Restructuring Work Environments”

The Five Elements of a “Simply Irresistible” Organization

Launching Today at Bersin by Deloitte IMPACT 2014 Conference

The Five Elements of a Simply Irresistible Organization

Posted by Josh Bersin on April 1, 2014

New Deloitte Global Human Capital Research shows that organizations today must work hard to create a meaningful, humanistic work environment to drive engagement, performance, and a magnetic attraction in the market.

And this is good business. The Great Place to Work Institute has published studies which show that the “100 best places to work” outperformed the S&P 500 by over four-fold from 1990–2009 and there’s no reason to believe this won’t continue. (“The Great Workplace,” by Michael Burchell and Jennifer Robin.)

Continue reading “The Five Elements of a “Simply Irresistible” Organization”

Bersin by Deloitte Announces 10 Predictions for HR, Learning, Talent, and HR Technology for 2014

Bersin Predictions 2014

Posted by Josh Bersin on December 19, 2013

The year 2014 will be an exciting and challenging one for HR, learning, and talent professionals.

Global economic growth will create a new level of competition for people. HR organizations will shift their focus from cost reduction to retention and engagement. Technology will continue to make the world a smaller place, forcing companies to improve their employment brand in every possible way. Data will become a new currency. Leadership will continue to be in short supply. And you, as an HR professional, will have to innovate and adapt to stay ahead.

Continue reading “Bersin by Deloitte Announces 10 Predictions for HR, Learning, Talent, and HR Technology for 2014”

Major Introductions, Meaningful Connections Highlight Workday Rising

workday rising

Posted by John Malikowski on October 15, 2013

It’s always energizing to be on the floor at Workday Rising — never more so than this year, with more than 3,500 people in attendance, including over 80 Deloitte practitioners from our member firms around the world — truly showing our global reach and activity around Workday. I continue to see and experience fantastic growth and demand for this event.

Continue reading “Major Introductions, Meaningful Connections Highlight Workday Rising”

Live from Workday Rising: The Emergence of Big Data in HR

Live from Workday Rising: The Emergence of Big Data in HR

Posted by Josh Bersin on September 10, 2013

This week at the Workday Rising conference, we are previewing our new research on Talent Analytics, which explains how companies are starting to build Big Data strategies around their people. Workday’s new product offering, Workday Big Data Analytics, brings together Big Data technology (Hadoop and other tools) with Workday’s object oriented database to make analytics easier and more approachable than ever before. But even with tools like Workday’s tool, the challenge is one of strategy, skills, process, and structure.

Continue reading “Live from Workday Rising: The Emergence of Big Data in HR”

No “One Right Answer” for a Universal Issue

Message to HR Leaders: “Be Bold in 2013”Posted by David Lusk and Scott Cole on March 15, 2013

It seems that no matter where in the world a business operates, it isn’t escaping pressures on the people side of the business.

This is the 19th year we have surveyed employers’ priorities for their rewards programs, but it is the first year we have included international employers. This year the Top Five Global Employer Rewards Priorities Survey includes responses from employers in 27 countries in the Americas, Asia Pacific, and EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) regions. Despite sharp differences in economic, political, and geographic challenges among the regions, survey responses showed much less variation in employer concerns about the following challenges:

  1. Attracting, motivating, and retaining employees
  2. Aligning Total Rewards strategy with business strategy and brand
  3. Motivating staff when pay increases are flat or non-existent
  4. Controlling the costs of employee benefits
  5. Realizing appropriate ROI from reward expenditures

Continue reading “No “One Right Answer” for a Universal Issue”