A better way forward: A business-first approach to leadership development

A better way forward: A business-first approach to leadership development
Posted by Noah Rabinowitz on November 09, 2016.

You may be familiar with cookbook approaches to leadership development: a dash of reading, a sprinkling of inspirational lectures, a few stretch assignments, a bit of mentoring, a case study or two, and even some cool field trips. The result might make leaders feel more prepared or more skilled in general and typically provides a great opportunity to expand their peer network, but the learning often isn’t readily applicable to the real-world problems of the business. In the second installment of our four-part series on leadership development, we look at how organizations can make the development effort more real, more relevant, and more likely to make a meaningful impact by tying it directly to the business.

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A better way forward: Digging out of the leadership development black hole

A better way forward: Digging out of the leadership development black hole
Posted by Noah Rabinowitz on September 09, 2016.

Leadership development is big business, to the tune of $31 billion in 2014.1 But where’s the payoff for that investment? Many companies don’t really know (and their consultants allow it to happen). They assume it’s a good thing to do, but leadership development is notorious for not being tracked or assessed in conjunction with the rest of the business or with the same rigor as other decisions and investments. This situation is not likely to be tolerated in any other area of the business and is clearly not sustainable. Yet here it persists, a veritable black hole where plenty of dollars go in, but few measurable results come out. I’d like to propose a better way.

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Social Learning: Getting from “we push” to “you pull”

Social Learning

Posted by Jennifer Stempel and Amy A. Titus on April 17, 2014

It’s tempting to think that social learning is about technology — after all, social media platforms and the Web 2.0 technologies that enable them are virtually inseparable. But as our recent overview (Social Learning: Empowering employees to learn from one another) points out, social learning is different: more about people than technology. Specifically, social learning is about people sharing knowledge to learn from and with one another. Technology might be involved, or it might not. A more important characteristic is that it provides learners the ability to pull the information they need, when and where they need it. That’s the ideal “teachable moment” and when learning can be most valuable and productive.

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