Organizational Network Analysis

Powering teams to better execute business strategy

Organizational Network Analysis

Posted by Tiffany McDowell, PhD and Don Miller on August 4, 2016.

Companies today are “living organizations” that must constantly adapt to market and industry pressures in order to stay competitive. This mode of continual change means they can no longer operate effectively in formal, rigid frameworks. Most executives recognize this shift—92 percent of surveyed leaders believe that redesigning their organization is either very important or important, and many are moving away from formal, functional structures and redesigning their organizations to be dynamic and team-based. Organizational Network Analysis (ONA) is a tool that can help manage living organizations to keep them agile and responsive to changes in the business environment.

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New Research: Changing business structure, dynamic roles, and new models of leadership top the Global Human Capital Trends for 2016


Posted by Josh Bersin on March 02, 2016

The new digital world of work is shaking the foundation of the world’s organizations: one of the biggest challenges companies now have is the need to fundamentally change the way they are structured.

This month we are launching our largest-ever study of talent challenges in business, the Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016. More than 7,000 companies around the world took the time to answer our survey, and the findings were striking. While nearly every talent challenge from last year became more acute, the No. 1 topic on people’s minds is now “how do I organize my company to effectively meet the digital demands of today?”

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2015 Millennial Survey gives insight to inform leadership and talent agendas

2015 Millennial Survey

Understanding how Millennials perceive businesses and what they expect from them is critical to engaging and attracting this workforce of the future. More than 7,800 Millennials in 29 global emerging and developed markets contributed their views to Deloitte’s fourth annual Millennial Survey. Their responses reveal a mix of positive and negative perceptions about business, with this overarching message: Business needs to reset its purpose to attract Millennials.

The survey results suggest businesses, particularly in developed markets, need to make significant changes to attract and retain the future workforce. On the plus side: 73 percent of Millennials surveyed believe that businesses are having a positive impact. This was especially true in the emerging markets of Indonesia (98 percent), Philippines (91 percent), India (90 percent), China (89 percent), and Mexico (89 percent). However, the highest number of respondents reporting a negative business impact on society came from developed markets: Germany (66 percent), Belgium (59 percent), France (56 percent), Japan (55 percent), and Italy (44 percent).

Also on the plus side, 61 percent of respondents believe many businesses take a strong leadership position on issues that impact wider society—showing even stronger leadership on important social issues than governments. However, an overwhelming 75 percent of those surveyed also question businesses’ motivation, believing many focus on their own agendas rather than helping to improve society. Instead, respondents believe business should focus on people and purpose, not just products and profits.

“The message is clear: When looking at their career goals, today’s Millennials are just as interested in how a business develops its people and how it contributes to society as they are in its products and profits,” said Barry Salzberg, CEO of Deloitte Global. “These findings should be viewed as a wake-up call to the business community, particularly in developed markets, that they need to change the way they engage Millennial talent or risk being left behind.”

Only 28 percent of Millennials feel their current organization is making full use of their skills. More than half (53 percent) aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization, with a clear ambition gap between Millennials in emerging markets and developed markets. Sixty-five percent of emerging-market-based Millennials said they would like to achieve this goal, compared to only 38 percent in developed markets. This figure was also higher among men.

Additionally, the survey found large global businesses have less appeal for Millennials in developed markets (35 percent) compared to emerging markets (51 percent). Developed-market-based Millennials are also less inclined (11 percent) than Millennials in emerging markets (22 percent) to start their own business.

Other notable findings from the survey include:

  • Millennials want to work for organizations with purpose. For six in 10 Millennials, a “sense of purpose,” is part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers.
  • Technology, media, and telecommunications (TMT) are the most attractive employers. TMT ranked most desirable sector and the one to provide the most valuable skills according to Millennials. Men (24 percent) were nearly twice as likely as women (13 percent) to rank TMT as the number one sector to work in. Google and Apple top the list of businesses that most resonated with Millennials as leaders, each selected by 11 percent of respondents.
  • Confidence Gap? Millennial men more likely to pursue leadership. Millennial men were somewhat more likely to say they would like to secure the “top job” within their organization than women (59 percent vs. 47 percent). Women were also less likely to rank their leadership skills at graduation as strong; 27 percent of men vs. 21 percent of women rated this skill as strong. However, when asked what they would emphasize as leaders women were more likely to say employee growth and development (34 percent compared to 30 percent), an area that many Millennials felt was lacking within their current organizations.
  • Organizations and colleges must do more to nurture emerging leaders. When asked to estimate the contributions that skills gained in higher education made to achievement of their organization’s goals, Millennials’ average figure is 37 percent.
  • The changing characteristics of leadership. Today’s Millennials place less value on visible (19 percent), well-networked (17 percent), and technically skilled (17 percent) leaders. Instead, they define true leaders as strategic thinkers (39 percent), inspirational (37 percent), personable (34 percent) and visionary (31 percent).

“Millennials want more from business than might have been the case 50, 20, or even 10 years ago,” said Salzberg. “They are sending a very strong signal to the world’s leaders that when doing business, they should do so with purpose. The pursuit of this different and better way of operating in the 21st century begins by redefining leadership.”

To access the full report and explore infographics about the survey, please visit: www.deloitte.com/millennialsurvey.


As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte Consulting LLP, a subsidiary of Deloitte LLP. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

The Five Elements of a “Simply Irresistible” Organization

Launching Today at Bersin by Deloitte IMPACT 2014 Conference

The Five Elements of a Simply Irresistible Organization

Posted by Josh Bersin on April 1, 2014

New Deloitte Global Human Capital Research shows that organizations today must work hard to create a meaningful, humanistic work environment to drive engagement, performance, and a magnetic attraction in the market.

And this is good business. The Great Place to Work Institute has published studies which show that the “100 best places to work” outperformed the S&P 500 by over four-fold from 1990–2009 and there’s no reason to believe this won’t continue. (“The Great Workplace,” by Michael Burchell and Jennifer Robin.)

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Re-engaging Your Workforce

10 Moments that Matter

Re-engaging Your Workforce

Posted by Sean Morris and Patrick Nealon on November 21, 2013

By now, the importance of an engaged workforce and its impact on the bottom line and mission success are well documented. In the past 10 years, a cottage industry – or larger – of boutique firms, coaches, and “new” tools have sprung up to help organizations better measure and assess how engaged their employees are. Several threads exist across these employee engagement services, including tying morale to business outcomes, developing new channels for communication across an enterprise, and promoting more meaningful face-to-face time between employees and managers. All good suggestions, but what are the concrete actions people can take to improve engagement, especially when times are tough?

What we’ve discovered at Deloitte is that regardless of the industry or organization, there are opportunities – “moments that matter” – that spark engagement. More so than “what” is done, these moments boil down to “how” it’s done. It is these moments and the “how” of what occurs that deepens connections and builds lasting relationships, creating value for those involved.

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Leading in a (True) Crisis

Leading in a (True) CrisisPosted by Neil Neveras on November 14, 2012

It’s easy to get caught up in the latest “crisis du jour” at work and sometimes it can seem that all you do as a leader is put out fires. But the idea of leading in a crisis took on a whole new meaning recently when I had the opportunity to facilitate the United Nations OCHA and Deloitte Leadership Summit for Humanitarian Coordinators, a collaboration between the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL) and Deloitte LLP (Deloitte).

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World-Class Talent Programs Aren’t Waiting for the Recovery

World-Class Talent Programs Aren't Waiting for the RecoveryPosted by Alice Kwan on January 20, 2011

How can we grow?
How can we build our leadership ranks?
How can we get the right talent in the right place?

These are the key questions senior executives and talent managers at large (+$500 million) companies are confronting in the face of lingering economic uncertainty and an uneven talent market. These results are from Talent Edge 2020: Redrafting talent strategies for the uneven recovery our latest survey in the Talent Edge 2020 series build from the findings of two earlier studies: a December 2010 report on executive attitudes and an April 2011 report on global employee attitudes and talent concerns.

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Leadership by Design

Leadership by DesignPosted by Neil Neveras and Eric Berger on November 10, 2011

“If I just had better leaders, I could _________”

That’s what I hear over and over from the companies with whom I work. Whether they fill in the blank with “expand into new markets” or “meet increasing regulatory demands” or “transform the company”—or some other pressing issue—they know that improved leadership is critical to meeting the challenge. What they are unsure of, however, is how to develop the leaders they need.

We see leadership development as a process—one that starts with getting crystal clear about your company’s top strategic priorities, then figuring out where your leadership gaps lie relative to those priorities and finally taking targeted actions (more than one!) to close the gaps. Like solving other business challenges, leadership development requires a systemic solution that considers many factors in an organized, thoughtful way.

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