A true HR strategy is about more than HR

Elevating HR’s role to drive a sustainable business future

Posted by Arthur Mazor, Amy Sobey and Ken Kunkleman on November 15, 2017.

Despite HR’s evolution over the past 20 years, HR is not consistently creating sustainable business value for organizations. Only 20 percent of business executives believe HR is adequately planning for their companies’ future talent needs1. And, only 22 percent feel confident that their organization is adapting well to employees’ needs. Coupled with workplace and workforce disruptions, the challenge to HR is clear: step it up, or you could lose your seat at the table.

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Looking beyond engagement and into worker passion

Looking beyond engagement and into worker passion

Posted by John Hagel III and Maggie Wooll on August 10, 2017.

We are in the early stages of a shift from a global economy focused on angst, fear, and erosion of trust to one defined by creativity, curiosity, imagination, and social intelligence. To make this shift successful requires a broad shift in how institutions engage with employees and embrace the future of work.

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Connected learners > Common business context > Accelerated learning

Connected learners
Posted by Anagha Sawant on June 22, 2017.

Businesses are transforming rapidly to keep pace with an increasingly digital world. However, their ability to embrace digital depends, to a large extent, on their talent’s ability to perform in this new and ever-changing environment. Employees are having to constantly learn, unlearn, and relearn to match steps with their changing work environments and job roles. And they are having to do this fast.  How can organizations accommodate with learning that is both fast-paced and constant?

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The path to HR sustainability

From the digital workplace to digital HR to sustainable HR

The path to HR sustainability
Posted by Michael Gretczko on October 27, 2016.

For those of us active in the realm of HR and business, “digital HR” and the “digital workplace” have been hot topics. But as is often the case with new terminology and buzzwords, they can mean different things to different people. We’ve thought a lot about the challenges HR faces and the role of “digital” in addressing them, and it’s more encompassing than many of the definitions we’ve seen. The digital workplace is what powers digital HR, which in turn enables HR to sustain itself in the face of disruption.

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Design thinking in action

Crafting the HR customer experience: An ongoing series

Architecting the HR customer experience: Design thinking in action
Posted by Michael Gretczko, Marc Solow, and Maribeth Sivak on September 20, 2016.

What if you could deliver an HR customer experience that is analogous to what big online retailers are doing to create a customized shopping experience, one in which HR customers are able to clearly see their options, access information, and take action more easily? What do you think the impact might be on your employment brand, retention, and engagement ratings? By applying design thinking to reimagine and architect the HR customer experience, companies can deliver an experience that feels more like a world-class retail experience—one in which HR customers perform activities digitally, both at their computer and on the go, in a way that can increase both engagement and satisfaction. Here’s an example of design thinking in action.

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Engaging the workforce

Getting past once-and-done measurement surveys to achieve always-on listening and meaningful response

Engaging the workforce
Posted by Alyson Daichendt on September 15, 2016.

More than 8 in 10 (85 percent) of the executives responding to our Global Human Capital Trends 2016 survey rated engagement as an important (38 percent) or very important (48 percent) priority for their companies. But company actions regarding engagement don’t always support that level of importance. Just over half of the respondents (64 percent) say they are measuring employee engagement once a year, and a surprising number—nearly one in five (18 percent)—said their companies don’t formally measure employee engagement at all. As the workforce and its expectations about work evolve rapidly, employers should start treating engagement as the business-critical issue it is.

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Culture vs. Engagement

Avoiding the runaway strategy bus (or getting it under control before it crashes)

Culture vs. Engagement

Posted by Alyson Daichendt on August 23, 2016.

We’re having a #TBT moment, thinking about the classic ’90s movie, Speed. You remember it—there’s a runaway bus that can’t drop below 50 mph or it will explode AND the driver is critically injured—dun dun dun…. Cue Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock jumping in and guiding the bus safely through traffic while diffusing the bomb and saving the day. What brought this to mind (other than a recent TV movie marathon on a rainy Sunday afternoon)? It’s a situation we see play out repeatedly in the workplace.

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It takes two to tango

Or, how much can organizations influence employee engagement?

It takes two to tango

Posted by Robin Erickson, Ph.D. on August 18, 2016.

I’ve been studying employee retention and engagement for almost 15 years. During that time, engagement rates—or more accurately, disengagement rates, have been an ongoing problem. Gallup’s State of the American Workplace reports that from 2000 to 2016, only 26 to 33.6 percent of American workers were engaged in their work—and 15 to 20 percent were actively disengaged.1,2 Aside from what we can intuitively glean from this situation (e.g., lackluster performance, people simply going through the motions), lack of engagement also factors into “trouble” metrics, such as increases in voluntary turnover, absentee rates, mistakes and safety issues, and employee claims (such as grievances, workers’ compensation applications, and Equal Employment Opportunity complaint filings).3

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Organizational Network Analysis

Powering teams to better execute business strategy

Organizational Network Analysis

Posted by Tiffany McDowell, PhD and Don Miller on August 4, 2016.

Companies today are “living organizations” that must constantly adapt to market and industry pressures in order to stay competitive. This mode of continual change means they can no longer operate effectively in formal, rigid frameworks. Most executives recognize this shift—92 percent of surveyed leaders believe that redesigning their organization is either very important or important, and many are moving away from formal, functional structures and redesigning their organizations to be dynamic and team-based. Organizational Network Analysis (ONA) is a tool that can help manage living organizations to keep them agile and responsive to changes in the business environment.

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