Supporting the untethered workplace

Mobility and the future of work

Supporting the untethered workplace
Posted by Stephen Redwood on February 8, 2017.

For years it was common to hear—and sympathize—when someone mentioned being “chained to my desk.” The phrase could suggest a few things: lack of workplace freedom, a very heavy workload, and even indispensability. Today, though, the way work gets done has become increasingly mobile. People no longer have to be at their desk to be working hard or filling an indispensable role, and many organizations have recognized the value of enabling more freedom in how and where employees work. In fact, our research found that mobility factors heavily in how C-suite leaders see the future of work.

Continue reading “Supporting the untethered workplace”

A new operating model for talent acquisition

A new operating model for talent acquisition
Posted by Arthur Mazor and Bill Cleary on December 13, 2016.

In our previous post, we looked at some of the ways HR can learn from leading practices for customer experience to improve talent acquisition. Enhancing the candidate experiences requires getting smarter about how organizations approach talent acquisition. According to Bersin by Deloitte, recruiting is already an expensive undertaking—US companies spend an average of $4,000 per hire—and it’s likely organizations will feel greater pressure to spend even more in the competition for the attention of Millennials and other talent.1 From social media to alumni networks, it’s time for companies to focus their investments on the areas of greatest payoff. That means linking recruitment more closely to overall corporate strategy as well as promoting a smoother ride for candidates through the process.

Continue reading “A new operating model for talent acquisition”

When research aligns: HR in three-part harmony

When research aligns: HR in three-part harmony
Posted by Bill Pelster on December 09, 2016.

We take research very seriously at Deloitte, for the direct and indirect value to our clients and for the validation that only comes from multiple research efforts independently producing similar results. Three of our recent reports canvassed thousands of business leaders about three fairly distinct topics:

Continue reading “When research aligns: HR in three-part harmony”

The candidate as customer

The new dynamics of talent acquisition

The candidate as customer
Posted by Arthur Mazor and Bill Cleary on November 15, 2016.

The competition for talent is intensifying. Continuing economic growth is giving skilled employees more leverage in the job market, raising the bar for companies looking for a talent edge over rivals. Gone are the days when HR could simply announce open positions and expect to get plenty of interested candidates.

Continue reading “The candidate as customer”

Design thinking in action

Crafting the HR customer experience: An ongoing series

Architecting the HR customer experience: Design thinking in action
Posted by Michael Gretczko, Marc Solow, and Maribeth Sivak on September 20, 2016.

What if you could deliver an HR customer experience that is analogous to what big online retailers are doing to create a customized shopping experience, one in which HR customers are able to clearly see their options, access information, and take action more easily? What do you think the impact might be on your employment brand, retention, and engagement ratings? By applying design thinking to reimagine and architect the HR customer experience, companies can deliver an experience that feels more like a world-class retail experience—one in which HR customers perform activities digitally, both at their computer and on the go, in a way that can increase both engagement and satisfaction. Here’s an example of design thinking in action.

Continue reading “Design thinking in action”

On trend: Organizing around teams

On trend: Organizing around teams

Posted by Walt Sokoll on August 30, 2016.

A startling 92 percent of companies responding to Deloitte’s 2016 Global Human Capital Trends research rated redesigning the organization as very important or important, making it the No. 1 trend in this year’s report. One of the primary ways we see this organizational restructuring playing out is in the rise of teams—companies moving away from traditional hierarchical organization structures and empowering networks of teams centered around customers, products, markets, or missions.

Continue reading “On trend: Organizing around teams”

Culture vs. Engagement

Avoiding the runaway strategy bus (or getting it under control before it crashes)

Culture vs. Engagement

Posted by Alyson Daichendt on August 23, 2016.

We’re having a #TBT moment, thinking about the classic ’90s movie, Speed. You remember it—there’s a runaway bus that can’t drop below 50 mph or it will explode AND the driver is critically injured—dun dun dun…. Cue Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock jumping in and guiding the bus safely through traffic while diffusing the bomb and saving the day. What brought this to mind (other than a recent TV movie marathon on a rainy Sunday afternoon)? It’s a situation we see play out repeatedly in the workplace.

Continue reading “Culture vs. Engagement”

It takes two to tango

Or, how much can organizations influence employee engagement?

It takes two to tango

Posted by Robin Erickson, Ph.D. on August 18, 2016.

I’ve been studying employee retention and engagement for almost 15 years. During that time, engagement rates—or more accurately, disengagement rates, have been an ongoing problem. Gallup’s State of the American Workplace reports that from 2000 to 2016, only 26 to 33.6 percent of American workers were engaged in their work—and 15 to 20 percent were actively disengaged.1,2 Aside from what we can intuitively glean from this situation (e.g., lackluster performance, people simply going through the motions), lack of engagement also factors into “trouble” metrics, such as increases in voluntary turnover, absentee rates, mistakes and safety issues, and employee claims (such as grievances, workers’ compensation applications, and Equal Employment Opportunity complaint filings).3

Continue reading “It takes two to tango”

Design thinking in HR: The arc of an experience


Posted by Ruth Schmidt on August 12, 2016.

User experience (UX) design, user-centered design, design thinking—they’re all ways of reimagining and improving something—a process, a product, a service, an event—by considering it from the perspective of the people experiencing it. We recently polled about 1,400 webinar participants (primarily HR professionals) and asked them what parts of their talent process were in need of this kind of retooling. Performance management got the most votes, cited by nearly a third (30 percent) of respondents. Let’s look at how an element of design thinking, considering the full “arc” of an experience, can be applied to performance management.

Continue reading “Design thinking in HR: The arc of an experience”