The secret of sustainable HR

The secret of sustainable HR

Posted by Erica Volini on April 12, 2016.

Last month, Deloitte was listed on Fortune’s Best Companies to Work for List…for the 17th year in a row (don’t worry, this isn’t a blog post about how great Deloitte is, although I am pretty proud of this organization). I still remember when we made the list for the first time. We were #8 and I remember thinking–where do we go from here? Given that it was 1998 and the heyday of exponential change hadn’t quite embedded itself in our lexicon, I couldn’t imagine how we could do much better. But what I really couldn’t envision was that 17 years later we would still be on that list. Achieving success is one thing, but sustaining it–especially in our ever-evolving world–that’s quite another.

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4 ways HR Shared Services is innovating with the times

4 ways HR Shared Services is innovating with the times

Posted by Laura Poindexter on November 12, 2015.

Companies originally set up HR Shared Services (HRSS) organizations as a way to centralize, save costs, and add efficiency to routine HR processes. But as technology has advanced, many of the basic transactions (e.g., inputting and updating employee data, entering a leave request) that used to be HRSS’ bread and butter have become self-service enabled, so leaders and employees can handle them without HRSS intervention. As a result, HRSS organizations have had to think about how to reinvent themselves to remain relevant to the business—including providing services that require more complex, higher-value-added interaction with employees, such as recruiting or employee and labor relations. The focus is increasingly on serving evolving employee needs and interests in line with shifts in how people live and work today. Here are four ways HRSS is innovating with the times.

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Talent challenges in US manufacturing amplified in global chemical industry

Shoring up your organizational governance and awareness

Posted by Duane Dickson and Marcus Johnson on October 28, 2015.

As discussed previously in HR Times, the US manufacturing industry faces significant talent challenges that threaten its future (see If you build it, will they come?, Uptick in manufacturing focuses attention on human capital, and Beating the skills shortage). The global chemical industry shares many of these same challenges, in particular: (1) impending retirement of older employees. (2) skills shortages among the generation that will replace retirees, and (3) the general unpopularity of the industry as an employer of choice. These talent challenges are amplified by intense changes in the industry itself, ranging from constrained margins and increasing cyclicality to activist investors and a dramatic decline in new product introductions. From our observations and experience with clients, many in the industry recognize that problems exist, but either aren’t acting with a sense of urgency or are paralyzed by the sheer magnitude of the challenge to take action to address it.

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Making corporate moves

When the business is moving, HR can lighten the load

How the cloud is helping to elevate talent needs in HR Shared Services

Posted by Danielle Feinblum on September 15, 2015.

Businesses move for many reasons—to support changes in the underlying operating model, to be closer to markets, customers, and resources (human or natural), to consolidate operations to save costs, to accommodate growth or divestiture via M&A transactions, to realize tax advantages, and more. Regardless of the motivation for the relocation, the process of relocating can seem overwhelming. HR can be a leader in helping to minimize disruption to the business and employees while helping the business achieve the intended results of the move.

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2015 Millennial Survey gives insight to inform leadership and talent agendas

2015 Millennial Survey

Understanding how Millennials perceive businesses and what they expect from them is critical to engaging and attracting this workforce of the future. More than 7,800 Millennials in 29 global emerging and developed markets contributed their views to Deloitte’s fourth annual Millennial Survey. Their responses reveal a mix of positive and negative perceptions about business, with this overarching message: Business needs to reset its purpose to attract Millennials.

The survey results suggest businesses, particularly in developed markets, need to make significant changes to attract and retain the future workforce. On the plus side: 73 percent of Millennials surveyed believe that businesses are having a positive impact. This was especially true in the emerging markets of Indonesia (98 percent), Philippines (91 percent), India (90 percent), China (89 percent), and Mexico (89 percent). However, the highest number of respondents reporting a negative business impact on society came from developed markets: Germany (66 percent), Belgium (59 percent), France (56 percent), Japan (55 percent), and Italy (44 percent).

Also on the plus side, 61 percent of respondents believe many businesses take a strong leadership position on issues that impact wider society—showing even stronger leadership on important social issues than governments. However, an overwhelming 75 percent of those surveyed also question businesses’ motivation, believing many focus on their own agendas rather than helping to improve society. Instead, respondents believe business should focus on people and purpose, not just products and profits.

“The message is clear: When looking at their career goals, today’s Millennials are just as interested in how a business develops its people and how it contributes to society as they are in its products and profits,” said Barry Salzberg, CEO of Deloitte Global. “These findings should be viewed as a wake-up call to the business community, particularly in developed markets, that they need to change the way they engage Millennial talent or risk being left behind.”

Only 28 percent of Millennials feel their current organization is making full use of their skills. More than half (53 percent) aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization, with a clear ambition gap between Millennials in emerging markets and developed markets. Sixty-five percent of emerging-market-based Millennials said they would like to achieve this goal, compared to only 38 percent in developed markets. This figure was also higher among men.

Additionally, the survey found large global businesses have less appeal for Millennials in developed markets (35 percent) compared to emerging markets (51 percent). Developed-market-based Millennials are also less inclined (11 percent) than Millennials in emerging markets (22 percent) to start their own business.

Other notable findings from the survey include:

  • Millennials want to work for organizations with purpose. For six in 10 Millennials, a “sense of purpose,” is part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers.
  • Technology, media, and telecommunications (TMT) are the most attractive employers. TMT ranked most desirable sector and the one to provide the most valuable skills according to Millennials. Men (24 percent) were nearly twice as likely as women (13 percent) to rank TMT as the number one sector to work in. Google and Apple top the list of businesses that most resonated with Millennials as leaders, each selected by 11 percent of respondents.
  • Confidence Gap? Millennial men more likely to pursue leadership. Millennial men were somewhat more likely to say they would like to secure the “top job” within their organization than women (59 percent vs. 47 percent). Women were also less likely to rank their leadership skills at graduation as strong; 27 percent of men vs. 21 percent of women rated this skill as strong. However, when asked what they would emphasize as leaders women were more likely to say employee growth and development (34 percent compared to 30 percent), an area that many Millennials felt was lacking within their current organizations.
  • Organizations and colleges must do more to nurture emerging leaders. When asked to estimate the contributions that skills gained in higher education made to achievement of their organization’s goals, Millennials’ average figure is 37 percent.
  • The changing characteristics of leadership. Today’s Millennials place less value on visible (19 percent), well-networked (17 percent), and technically skilled (17 percent) leaders. Instead, they define true leaders as strategic thinkers (39 percent), inspirational (37 percent), personable (34 percent) and visionary (31 percent).

“Millennials want more from business than might have been the case 50, 20, or even 10 years ago,” said Salzberg. “They are sending a very strong signal to the world’s leaders that when doing business, they should do so with purpose. The pursuit of this different and better way of operating in the 21st century begins by redefining leadership.”

To access the full report and explore infographics about the survey, please visit: www.deloitte.com/millennialsurvey.


As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte Consulting LLP, a subsidiary of Deloitte LLP. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

HR Times Redux: Have you seen these top posts?

labor Cost Optimization

Over the past three years, HR Times has been discussing the talent-workforce-leadership-learning-organizational sphere with a broad audience of HR leaders and practitioners from business, industry, and government. We’ve looked at the trends and technologies, the challenges and risks, and the opportunities and imperatives for the future. Now we’re taking a brief look back. Here are a few of the top posts that have garnered the most attention. Did you miss any? Take a look and take away some food for thought.

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Localizing HR doesn’t mean abandoning global standardization

Global standardization

Posted by Michael Stephan on June 19, 2014

For years we’ve worked with global organizations to help them standardize their HR practices around the world with the aim to lower costs while improving HR’s ability to efficiently serve the business and employees. This work often involves complex and sweeping transformation efforts, significant investments in ERP/SaaS platforms and shared service centers, and other changes in HR’s structure, technology, and processes. Now one of the Global Human Capital Trends 2014 looks at the ways a new model of “high-impact” HR is reshaping the global and local HR function. The idea is to retain globalized practices and infrastructure, but with localized flexibility to address the realities of specific countries or markets. It’s standardization with a twist — and that twist is what enables HR services to be more business-driven and ultimately more effective.

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The Five Elements of a “Simply Irresistible” Organization

Launching Today at Bersin by Deloitte IMPACT 2014 Conference

The Five Elements of a Simply Irresistible Organization

Posted by Josh Bersin on April 1, 2014

New Deloitte Global Human Capital Research shows that organizations today must work hard to create a meaningful, humanistic work environment to drive engagement, performance, and a magnetic attraction in the market.

And this is good business. The Great Place to Work Institute has published studies which show that the “100 best places to work” outperformed the S&P 500 by over four-fold from 1990–2009 and there’s no reason to believe this won’t continue. (“The Great Workplace,” by Michael Burchell and Jennifer Robin.)

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Finding an Authentic Leadership Voice

Finding an Authentic Leadership Voice

Posted by Tom Morrison on August 7, 2013

In Deloitte’s recent survey of 1,300 business and HR leaders in 59 countries, 61 percent of respondents around the world (64 percent in the U.S.) consider the need to improve leadership development to be a top, highly relevant trend today. That finding certainly jibes with what we hear from clients, and from my experiences recently at a well-known leadership conference. There I interacted with a broad range of executives from all parts of their organizations, with the consensus that gaps in the leadership pipeline are a pressing concern and that the leadership development and mobility programs many have been cultivating over the last 20 years or so aren’t getting the job done.

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