Upping your game: From functional experts to business advisers

Learning Measurement Part 1

Posted by Erin Clark , David Fineman, Praveen Kaushik, and Mariana Aguilar on August 6, 2018.

For many businesses, our behaviors as consumers—our clicks, our scans, our searches—drive decisions about how, where, and when to place certain information in front of us. And that placement, determined by our own behaviors, can result in higher sales and greater revenue per advertising dollar for many of those businesses. Data and the analytics horsepower that yield these kind of insights are quickly becoming table stakes for the way most organizations interact with and engage with customers. A business strategy without a data strategy is often an indicator of a company’s naiveté,1 and many are becoming data-driven businesses. Why, then, do learning leaders often continue to struggle with the age-old battle of evaluating the value of learning to the business? Why do they continue to find it so difficult to justify increased investment? The answer: They are thinking about the problem all wrong.

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How well are you managing workers’ compensation claims?

The right analytics approach could yield substantial savings

Posted by Matt Carrier and Frank Zizzamia on May 17, 2018.

The “80/20” rule is commonly applied to workers’ compensation claims: namely, that 80 percent of the cost comes from 20 percent of the claims. What if you could consistently predict whether a claim would fall in that costliest 20 percent so you could handle it in a way that mitigates the risk?

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Upskilling HR in People Analytics


Posted by Madhura Chakrabarti on March 20, 2018.

People analytics has rapidly become an essential tool for improving individual performance, enhancing employee experience, and achieving business goals. But while many companies now have people analytics teams in place, HR practitioners are not all conversant with data or analytics yet. In fact, in nearly 60 percent of companies, basic data literacy skills are not yet in place across the HR organization.1

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Is your contingent workforce program becoming obsolete?

Posted by Brian Proctor, Kathryn Charlton, Dana Flynn-Rea and Dave Yerks on October 4, 2017.

Your organization, like most of those we see, is probably already incorporating contingent workers in your talent mix, and likely seeing year-over-year increases in the number of contingent workers in your workforce. In Deloitte’s 2016 Global Human Capital Trends report, 51 percent of global executives surveyed said they plan to increase or significantly increase the use of contingent workers in the next three to five years, with only 16 percent expecting a decrease.1 But, even if you think your contingent workforce program has been up and running efficiently, it’s important to revisit it regularly. The contingent market is evolving rapidly, and keeping your program on autopilot could risk it falling far behind.

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Using people analytics to improve health care performance

Using people analytics to improve health care performance

Posted by Brian Augustian on August 18, 2017.

Health care providers tend to lag other industries in the adoption of new business processes and technologies, and we find this to be consistent in the industry’s use of big data and analytics to improve organization performance. This is likely due to a number of factors, including the nature of health care work, tight financial margins and limited funds, and historically conservative cultures. Yet, the successful use of data analytics in other industries could indicate that it’s time for health care systems to up their game.

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Using people analytics to get to High-Impact HR

Posted by  David Fineman on August 3, 2017.

High-Impact HR refers to an HR function that helps the business excel in key areas—adapting to market changes, introducing new products and services faster, being more responsive to customer needs, operating efficiently and cost-effectively, and beating the competition. People analytics, which is really a subset of business analytics, is a key enabler of High-Impact HR. Deloitte’s 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report tells us that 71 percent of surveyed executives see people analytics as a high priority, and are applying it to talent challenges, as you might expect, particularly in recruiting and also in performance measurement, compensation, workforce planning, and retention.1 But it’s not just about HR—people analytics addresses business issues, too.

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Workforce analytics Part 2: Informing labor cost optimization


Lisa Disselkamp, on June 21, 2016.

In Workforce analytics Part 1, we discussed three key questions about labor spending that workforce analytics can help organizations answer: (1) How am I doing?, (2) If there are problems, where and when are they happening specifically?, and (3) Is there a business case for change? In Part 2, we look at the how to use the answers analytics uncovers and put them to work in the form of labor cost optimization: the process of refining policy, people, process, and technology to realize desired savings and improvements.

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Workforce analytics Part 1: Exposing payroll leakage

Can you answer three key questions about your labor spending?


Posted by Lisa Disselkamp on May 19, 2016

Do you know if you are spending more on payroll than necessary? The question goes beyond conducting an audit to find errors and fraud. The deeper question to ask is this: Is there unnecessary labor expense that is not the result of a mistake or abuse but has become a source of overspending? Many employers don’t know if they are suffering from inflated time-worked reporting or hidden, unproductive paid time. Without oversight, employers are likely to be paying incorrect (i.e., unnecessary, unintended) time correctly, instead of paying the correct time correctly. Continue reading “Workforce analytics Part 1: Exposing payroll leakage”