Rethinking talent management

Part I: The rise of contingent talent

Talent Management

Posted by Michael Gretczko and John J. Gillen on December 3, 2014.

HR’s identity is built around managing the people side of the business — recruiting, hiring, developing, and retaining the workforce needed to keep the organization up and running. But now that workforce is fundamentally changing. Contingent workers — “non-employees” not legally employed by the companies they work for — make up close to 20% of the workforce, and their numbers are growing at a brisk pace.1 What does this mean for organizational talent management overall and for HR specifically? We’ll explore this trend and its implications over three posts; this one on the rise of contingent talent, the second considering the need for HR to reengage with the non-employee workforce, and the third looking at ways some new freelance management systems (FMS) are changing the way talent is acquired, assigned, managed and rated.

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Passion in need of a champion

The best workers will find their own way, but if you want your organization to thrive, supporting them has to be a priority

DUP825

Posted by John Hagel III on November 13, 2014

“I never ask for permission. I just do it.”

“I get restless often.”

“I want my work to make an impact on something important to society.”

“I have a series of mini-failures every day.”

“I like to know that what I’m doing matters to the company.”

“I don’t want to do anything that I can’t learn from.”

For an HR executive, these statements pose a challenge. How does your organization treat people who might make these statements or operate with these beliefs? Does your performance management system recognize or penalize them? Does management encourage this type of employee or view them with suspicion or perhaps, unwittingly—as is often the case—do the daily processes and policies of the organization subtly discourage these behaviors, wearing the employee down bit by bit or sending a message that they belong elsewhere?

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HR Chargebacks: Avoiding the pitfalls, realizing the benefits

HR Chargebacks

Posted by Art Mazor and Gary Johnsen on October 30, 2014

In Part I of our discussion of HR chargebacks, we noted that chargebacks are a natural step in the evolution of HR from a purely transactional function to a strategic partner with the business. Done well, chargeback programs can offer a number of benefits — HR clarity, efficiency, cost control, and more. Done poorly, the desire to add accountability and alignment to HR costs and programs can backfire. Here in Part II, we explore some of the ways to execute chargebacks effectively.

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How a small business unit achieved a 99% participation rate in its employee survey—and actually did something with the results

Talent Survey

Posted by Nicolay Worren on October 28, 2014

Employees are asked about all kinds of things, in meetings, interviews, and “official” surveys. But is anybody actually listening to them or using their ideas? If not, why are we asking? “Sham participation” is demoralizing to employees and inefficient for the organization.

Of course, leaders have the option of making decisions without consulting others. Most employees fully understand they can’t be consulted on everything, and accept that somebody needs to make a decision. So do that if you don’t really intend to incorporate feedback into your decision process. It will save time for everybody.

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HR Chargebacks: An important step in HR’s journey

Businessman in Conference Room

Posted by Art Mazor and Gary Johnsen on October 23, 2014

As HR finds its seat at the business table, it faces increasing scrutiny to demonstrate, like its counterparts around that table, how HR contributes to the business strategy and objectives.This scrutiny is good for HR in that it moves the function further from a purely transactional cost center to a strategic business partner. It also forces HR to be more accountable for how it manages the business of HR and aligns the cost of its operations and programs to business objectives. A chargeback process is a common “go to” approach for providing visibility into internal or shared costs and increasing accountability for cost management, yet can bring a mixture of benefits and pitfalls if not designed and implemented properly.

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“I know the perfect person…”

Boosting recruiting and retention through employee referral programs

Talent Referral

Posted by Robin Erickson on October 21, 2014

Tapping current employees to source new candidates is a viable recruiting strategy for many reasons: high return on investment (Bersin research found that 9 percent of the overall spend for sourcing went to employee referrals, delivering 16 percent of new hires1 ); good cultural fit (employees tend to refer candidates with similar skills and attributes); access to specialized or hard-to-find skills (people typically network with others in similar roles); and long-term effectiveness (one study showed a 42 percent retention rate after three years for employees hired through employee referral programs vs.32 percent for employees hired through job boards and 14 percent for career site hires2).

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Are you missing out on a rich source of needed talent?

The case for hiring the long-term unemployed

Stay focused

Posted by Alice Kwan and Danielle Hawkins on October 16, 2014

There’s a very good chance your organization is turning away viable, high-quality candidates for one reason: They’ve been looking for work longer than other candidates.

As of August 2014, 3 million Americans1 of all ages, ethnicities, geographies, industries, and education and experience levels are considered long-term unemployed (LTU), meaning they have been actively seeking work for more than 27 weeks without success. The LTU apply to 3.5 times more jobs than recently unemployed job seekers, yet receive 45 percent fewer callbacks for interviews.2 Evidence shows no difference in capability or quality of work produced between the LTU and the recently unemployed,3 yet the stigma associated with lengthy employment gaps persists.

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Challenge: Will HR be a hero or a victim?

Will HR be a hero or a victim

The status quo for HR isn’t encouraging — at least according to our global survey of 2500+ leaders in 90 countries:

  • Less than 8 percent of HR leaders have confidence that their teams have the skills needed to meet the challenge of today’s global environment and consistently deliver innovative programs that drive business impact.
  • Business leaders agree: 42 percent of business leaders believe their HR teams are underperforming or just getting by, compared to the 27 percent who rate HR as excellent or good when assessing HR and talent programs.

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What’s pushing the development of “leaders at all levels”?

Talent Acquisition social media strategy

Posted by Neil Neveras on September 24, 2014

Our Global Human Capital Trends 2014 report points to leadership as the No. 1 talent issue facing organizations around the world and highlights a significant “readiness gap” between the need to develop leaders at all levels and organizations’ ability to actually do it. Let’s take a closer look, first examining how CEOs and CHROs are thinking about this issue of leadership development and building their pipeline, and then looking at how they’re going about it.

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Talent is universal

Just as the need for talent is universal, the solution can be as well. Are you familiar with the Open Talent Economy? We first met it as a Human Capital trend, where it explored the notion of expanding talent networks beyond “balance sheet” employees to include “partnership talent” (employees who are parts of joint ventures), “borrowed talent” (employees who are part of contractors or outsourcing relationships), “freelance talent” (independent, individual contractors), and “open source talent” (people who don’t work for you at all, but are part of your value chain and services).

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